Fashion Sweaters for Men

Men’s winter wear is no more a protection garment but a style statement. Gone are the days of a simple snow-proof overcoat and big buttoned leather jackets in browns and black. Combining style in regular outfits is the mantra.

Sweaters are going through a makeover from simple polo necked ones to zippers and pull overs. The quality of wool is also getting superior to overcome lint problems after a wash. As winter nears, shops are stocked with bright colours in red, orange, aqua blue and pristine whites. There is a variety of range offered with context to fabric and the use. Short coats in woolen are wearable for mild winters in tropical areas. Matched with a muffler and a head gear one is ready to meet the winter winds.

Ponchos for men come in huge stripes or monotonous fish net kind of woolen weaving. Easy to wear and discard, this is a regular wear in the hilly areas. Formal comfort in woolens includes designer jackets. A leather and denim jacket is a compulsory wardrobe asset for men. Heavy denims are perfect for cool night outings.

The idea is to experiment with colours and break the boredom. Style and skin comfort need not be compromised. Pure woolens are a treasure and last for years and investing in them is a good idea. Wraps and shawls are easy wears. Special heavy thermals and tough boots for expeditions. Mens winter coats are also available in a wide range of fabric, patterns and designs.

Necklines can be chosen from low v necks to round necks, Chinese collars, collared T shirts and Turtlenecks. Whether sleeveless, half sleeved or full sleeves comfort is guaranteed. Heavy lined track pants and shirts with hoods for casual wear. Knit wear is classy and comes in medium weights. Choose among, heavy weight woolens, wrap, inner vests, cashmere, sweaters that allow a peek of your shirt collars (shells) or change your style with a fleece jacket.

Feel wonderful with a trench coat, thermal inners vests and slacks, snow proof easy-wash jackets and jumpers and you are ready to face this winter.

For more resources on men’s winter wear and fashion trends check innovations in fashion designing [http://www.fashiondesigning.in].

History of High Heel Shoes

High heel shoes can have an amazing effect on women and are able to fill them with pleasure and excitement when shopping for them at Prada. The shoe in particular is a matter of contentious and heated discussion. No other shoe has gestured toward sexuality and sophistication as much as the high-heeled shoe. So many women are dreaming of having their closets full of shoes, but in reality they are merely pay attention to the fact that shoes could be one of the oldest inventions of our ancestors.

Heels are not a modern invention. Rather, they enjoy a rich and varied history, for both men as well as women. Controversy exists over when high heels were first invented, but the consensus is that heels were worn by both men and women throughout the world for many centuries.

Most of the lower class in ancient Egypt walked barefoot, but figures on murals dating from 3500 B.C. depict an early version of shoes worn mostly by the higher classes. In ancient Greece and Rome, platform sandals called kothorni, later known as buskins in the Renaissance, were shoes with high wood or cork soles that were popular particularly among actors who would wear shoes of different heights to indicated varying social status or importance of characters.

Around 1500, European nobility developed heels as a separate part of their shoes, primarily as a means to help keep their feet in the stirrups. The wear of heels by men quickly became the fashion norm, primarily in the courts, and this practice spawned the term, “well-heeled” as a reference to those who could afford the costlier shoes.

The modern European fashion of the high heel comes from the Italian “chapiney” or “chopine” style: mounted shoes on a 15 to 42 cm high cylinder. In 1430 chopines were prohibited in Venice, but nothing could stop the trend. The invention of the high heel is attributed to Catherine of Medici in Paris, in the 16th century, who used them due to her short stature, and soon introduced them into fashion amongst the European aristocracy. At the age of 14, Catherine de Medici was engaged to the powerful Duke of Orleans, later the King of France.

In the 17th century, the English Parliament punished as witches all women who used high heels to seduce men into marrying them. In his biography, the famous Giovanni Casanova declared his love for high heels, which raised women’s hoop skirts, thus showing their legs.

In 1791, the “Louis” high heels disappeared with the revolution, and Napoleon banished high heels in an attempt to show equality. Despite the Napoleonic Code against high heels, in 1793 Marie Antoinette went to the scaffold to be executed wearing two-inch heels.

In the 1860s, heels as fashion became popular again, and the invention of the sewing machine allowed greater variety in high heels. In Victorian art and literature, cartoons and allusions to tiny feet and the affliction of large feet (typical of the elderly spinster) were ubiquitous. Victorians thought that the high heel emphasized the instep arch, which was seen as symbolic of a curve of a woman.

While heels enjoyed widespread popularity in the late nineteenth century but the Depression during the 1930s influenced Western shoe fashion as heels became lower and wider.

With the creation of the miniskirt in the early 1960s, stilettos came into fashion and were attached to boots that enhanced the look of bare legs. A stiletto heel is a long, thin heel found on some boots and shoes, usually for women. It is named after the stiletto dagger, the phrase being first recorded in the early 1930s. Stiletto heels may vary in length from 2.5 centimetres (1 inch) to 5 cm (2 inches) or more if a platform sole is used.

Unlike the medieval period of Europe, when extravagance was more sought after that practicality, the fashion today trumps comfort. Women in the 21st century have more shoe choices than ever before. From athletic wear to the 2006 “heelless” high heel, women can choose to wear what they want, even hybrid shoes such as “heeled” tennis shoes and flip flops. While these may be oddities of fashion, they gesture toward an exciting array of fashion choices women have today.

Every woman deserves to wear shoes which match her outfit, look elegant and wrap her delicate feet. Whether they are lace up, platform or clear heel each of the shoes definitely compliments the outfit and makes the women love walking and feeling sexy.

When it comes to high heels they are teasing and flattering, they make women feel special and empowered as well as highly confident regardless of when or how they are worn.

What Causes Leg Swelling?

Leg inflammation or leg edema is a frequent medical malady. The main reason of leg inflammation should be discovered and healed. It should not be pushed aside nor be dealt with liquid pills except if the cause has been identified. There are six biggest causes of leg swelling.

The major source of leg swelling is chronic venous insufficiency. Vein disease or vein disorders happen twice as often as coronary artery disease, three times more frequently than peripheral arterial disease, or PAD, and almost five times more widespread than congestive heart failure.

Vein disease has six names:

  • Venous stasis
  • Varicose veins
  • Chronic venous insufficiency
  • Venous hypertension
  • Venous reflux disease

Lymphedema
In this health issue the veins in the legs suffer a loss of their power to transfer the used blood back up and out of the legs to the heart, lungs, liver, and kidneys to be filtered, replenished with essential nutrients and oxygen, and transported back out to the body. When this occurs, high pressure occurs in your leg veins. This high pressure results in discharging of fluid and other blood components into the leg outside of the blood vessels. When the veins are not able to effectively deliver the blood out of the legs with each heart beat, your heart pumps blood into your legs under increased and higher pressures. This can cause a generalized engorgement of the veins in your legs and accompanying this will come added leakage.

In addition, the blood in your legs ends up being rather toxic since it has not been cleaned by your kidneys. The quantity of oxygen in the blood lowers below normal. The nutrition is used up, and the waste from your legs gather in the uncirculated blood in your legs. This builds a generalized harmful state in your legs. This “toxic” blood makes your legs ill and creates inflammation. All these things result in swelling.
Swelling from veins is best early in the day and worse during the night time. When you lay down at night the blood finally comes back out of your legs and it is then filtered by your kidneys, nutrients is replenished by your intestines, your lungs add oxygen, your liver processes the blood, and your heart is able to pump the good healthy blood back out to the legs which are no longer engorged, the pressure in the legs is back to normal, and the blood is now good and healthy. By the morning your legs ought to seem at their very best and the cycle will begin again once you stand up and gravity alongside damaged venous circulation hinders the blood from returning again.

Congestive Heart Failure
The second most frequent reason for swelling to the legs is congestive heart failure. Over the years, before vein disease was understood very well, congestive heart failure was felt to be the reason behind all leg swelling until it can be medically backed differently, thus multiple patients with leg swelling some time ago and even now will take several different cardiac assessments to eliminate heart failure as a root cause. Definitely venous disease is considered the most common underlying cause and most people have a normal cardiac workup.

In the patients with congestive heart failure, the common signs or symptoms is generally difficulty of breathing. While resting many have difficulty of breathing on exertion and when they lie down flat. This is known as orthopnea and it frequently results in these people having to rest with their head elevated because once they lay totally horizontal it allows significant breathing difficulties.

Congestive heart failure is largely a consequence of one or both of two underlying health disorders; these are coronary artery disease or clots in the arteries and undiagnosed or untreated high arterial blood pressure or “hypertension”.

Kidney Failure
The third most frequent reason for leg swelling or leg edema is kidney failure. Progressed kidney failure will hinder the body’s ability to clear itself of surplus fluid resulting in fluid retention and leg swelling. It can also be correlated with undiagnosed arterial hypertension which is much more widespread in persons with diabetes.

Liver Failure
The fourth major cause of leg edema or leg swelling is liver failure. This could be a little bit more tricky, but when the liver is not operating very well the required protein in your bloodstream drops to dangerously low levels which then may cause leakage of fluid out of the vascular system and into the tissue, resulting in swelling in your legs or even abdomen. Most of these patients frequently have considerable swelling in their abdomen as well.

Thyroids
The fifth common root cause of leg edema is low thyroid or hypothyroidism. This is known as pretibial myxedema. This is also a little complicated, but once your thyroid hormones decline to an unhealthy level and is still there for a considerable amount of time your overall rate of metabolism declines very low and this contributes to swelling in your legs.

Lymphedema
Lastly, Lymphedema is where vessels often called lymphatics get damaged or blocked for many reasons, contributing to the incapability of your body to clear fluids from your legs. Many times this is as a result of lasting neglected venous insufficiency, but can even be resulting from trauma, operation, and much less likely cancer.

Regardless of the underlying cause, leg swelling is never natural, and a reason needs to be determined and dealt with accordingly. To identify the trigger of swelling in your legs, call Dr. Morgan in Houston at the Lone Star Vein Center. We specialize in treating vein disease using non-invasive and painless procedures such as VNUS Closure to return the health of your legs. Schedule an appointment and contact (281) 292-0121 to find out more.